Troubleshooting Indoor Vent Free Gas Wall Heaters, Stoves and Fireplaces

All installed gas products sold by World Marketing of America Inc. should only be installed and/or serviced by a qualified installer, service agency, or gas supplier. The information published on this website is meant to further educate the end user. This information does not replace the owner’s manual provided with the heater. The owner’s manual must be read and all instructions followed to avoid potentially hazardous conditions.

My heater won’t light.

Over the summer months dust, dirt, and even spiders may have settled into an idle heater. This can clog the pilot light orifice. A simple cleaning could have this heater operating in less than 15 minutes. Follow the instructions in your Owner’s Manual. 

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My pilot light keeps going out.

The most common reason is that dust and dirt are starting to build up, but are not yet quite bad enough to prevent the heater from lighting all together. A simple cleaning could have this heater operating in less than 15 minutes. See the cleaning and maintenance information section below.

If this problem is happening during installation or when other gas appliances supplied by the same line are in operation, you may have low gas pressure.  This could be caused by either using too small of a diameter supply line or low inlet pressure. Contact you gas supplier.

If you are trying to use a vent free gas appliance at a location higher than 4500 feet, the pilot will not stay lit as the air is too thin and there is not enough oxygen for proper operation. There is no solution for this.

If you have hooked the heater up to the wrong gas type, you may have this problem. Check your gas supply.

If your heater operates for awhile and then shuts off, including the pilot, you may be using the appliance in too small of a space. Vent Free Appliances require sufficient oxygen to operate.  This problem is most commonly found when too large of an appliance is used in too small of a space, although it can occur if a house is very tightly insulated. Adding additional ventilation can be as simple as opening a window. Check your Owner’s Manual for more details on ventilation.

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Cleaning and maintenance of your heater

WARNING: Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service, or maintenance can cause injury or property damage. Refer to the OWNER’S MANUAL for correct installation and operational procedures. For assistance or additional information, consult a qualified installer, service agency, or local gas supplier.

CAUTION: You must keep control areas, burner, and circulating air passageways of appliance clean. Inspect these areas of appliance before each use. Have appliance inspected yearly by a qualified service person. Appliance may need more frequent cleaning due to excessive lint from carpeting, bedding material, pet hair, etc. Failure to perform this maintenance can lead to soot buildup around the appliance and throughout the area.

We recommend that you clean the unit at least every 2 to 3 months or after 2000 hours of operation. More frequent cleaning may be needed based on how and where you use your heater. A yellow tip on the pilot flame or lifting of the flame indicates dust and dirt in the pilot assembly. If you experience difficulty in keeping the pilot light lit, follow the maintenance steps noted below. See your Owner’s Manual for complete details. We also recommend that you keep the burner tube and pilot assembly clean and free of dust and dirt. To clean these parts we recommend using compressed air no greater than 30 PSI. You can also use a vacuum cleaner in the blow position. If using compressed air in a can, please follow the directions on the can. Failure to follow these directions could damage the pilot assembly.

  1. Shut off the unit, including the pilot. Allow the unit to cool for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Inspect burner, pilot, and primary air inlet holes on injector holder for dust and dirt.
  3. Blow air through the ports/slots and holes in the burner.
  4. Check the injector holder located at the end of the burner tube again. Remove any large particles of dust, dirt, lint, or pet hair with a soft cloth or vacuum cleaner nozzle.
  5. Blow air into the primary air holes on the injector holder.
  6. In case any large clumps of dust have now been pushed into the burner repeat steps 3 and 4.

Clean the pilot assembly. A yellow tip on the pilot flame or lifting of the flame indicates dust and dirt in the pilot assembly. There is a small pilot air inlet hole about 2 inches from where the pilot flame comes out of the pilot assembly. With the unit off, lightly blow air through the air inlet hole. You may blow through a drinking straw if compressed air is not available. Do NOT insert anything into the pilot tube as this may damage the assembly.

MAIN BURNER
Periodically inspect all burner flame holes with the fireplace running. All slotted burner flame holes should be open with yellow flame present. Some burner flame holes may become blocked by debris or rust, with no flame present. If so, turn off fireplace and let cool. Either remove blockage or replace burner. Blocked burner flame holes will create soot. Only a qualified technician can replace parts.

CABINET
AIR PASSAGEWAYS

Use a vacuum cleaner or pressurized air to clean.

EXTERIOR

Use a soft cloth dampened with a mild soap and water mixture. Wipe the cabinet to remove dust.

LOGS
If the appliance has logs, check for dark streaks, soot buildup, cracked, or broken pieces.

If you remove logs for cleaning, refer to OWNER’S MANUAL to properly replace logs. Most logs are designed to fit on retention pins. Placement on these pins is very important.

Flames should be observed while in operation. If a log is improperly placed and the flame is impinging (coming in contact with) on the log it can cause sooting and may produce carbon monoxide. If flames are impinging the logs, the unit should be turned off, allowed to cool and then the appropriate log(s) adjusted.

Replace log(s) if broken or chipped (dime-sized or larger).

CAUTION

The following activities can cause SOOTING:

  • Operating a ceiling fan
  • Smoking cigarettes, cigars, pipes
  • Dirty Burner or Pilot
  • Dirty firebox/chimney
  • Burning candles or oil lamps
  • Burning incense
  • Placing objects near or in the flame
  • Flames touching logs

All installed gas products sold by World Marketing of America Inc. should only be installed and/or serviced by a qualified installer, service agency, or gas supplier. The information published on this website is meant to further educate the end user. This information does not replace the owner’s manual provided with the heater. The owner’s manual must be read and all instructions followed to avoid potentially hazardous conditions.

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My igniter won’t spark. (Battery operated).

The battery may not be installed, or is installed backwards.

The battery may be weak or dead. Try replacing it.

The igniter wire might simply be loose and in need of tightening.

There could be a crack in the igniter wire. In this case you may see a spark from somewhere else on the wire. You may need to replace the wire if it is damaged.

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My igniter won’t spark. (Piezo Type).

If you do not hear a loud snap when you press down on the igniter, the igniter needs replaced.

If you hear a loud snap, but there is no spark at the igniter, the igniter wire might simply be loose and in need of tightening.

If you hear a loud snap, but there is no spark at the igniter, there could be a crack in the igniter wire. In this case you may see a spark from somewhere else on the wire. You may need to replace the wire if it is damaged.

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There is no gas coming through the pilot.

If this is a new installation of a liquid propane (LP) appliance it is likely that an external regulator was not installed. If the gas flows to the regulator under too much pressure, the internal regulator will close. This is not a defect.  Contact your qualified installer for additional information.

If too small of a gas line is used, there may not be sufficient pressure to maintain the pilot light or the pilot may go out as soon as the main burner is lit. The only solution is to install the correct sized pipe.

If the water column pressure is too low and piping of sufficient size has been used, contact your gas supplier to see if the gas pressure can be increased.

When attempting to light your appliance you must turn both the control knob to the pilot position and press the knob down at the same time to start the flow of gas. The gas will not flow if the knob is not fully depressed. Once the pilot is lit, continue to hold down the valve for 30 seconds and release.  If the pilot does not stay lit, you may have air left in the lines from installation. Repeat the lighting process until the pilot remains lit. This may take several attempts after initial installation.

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Odors.

Operating your heater where impurities in the air exist may create odors. Cleaning supplies, paint, paint remover, cigarette smoke, cements and glues, new carpet, candles, air freshners, textiles, etc., create fumes. These fumes may mix with combustion air and create odors. You will want to ventilate the room of all odors and clean the unit.

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Slight smoke or odor during initial operation.

It’s normal for some residue from the manufacturing process to be on the appliance. Operate the unit on high for four to six hours with your windows open to burn off the “NEW” odor and the smell should go away.

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My gas stove/fireplace is smoking.

In most cases, this is a problem in log placement or use. If a log is touching the flame or just "licking" it once in awhile it will still leave soot. Wipe the appliance clean and burn it without logs for an hour or so. Chances are it will be clean indicating that you have placed the logs incorrectly. If the flames are bouncing around, it may be a draft from a doorway or a ceiling fan causing the problem. If there seems to be smoke coming off of a hot painted surface, then it's probably just some oil left behind from the factory. This will stop.

If the soot is not in the heater, but on the walls, around windows etc., then this is a sign that something in the air (household chemicals, dust, candle wax, cigarette smoke, etc.) is being burned. This will stop once the air in the room is clean and clear of contaminants. Other factors affecting the heater can be a lot of cooking odors in the air, high moisture from a big family with heavy shower use, any remodeling, etc.

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Problems in use above 4500 ft.

Vent-free heaters will not work consistently above 4500 feet. At these elevations there is not enough pure oxygen present to produce the correct pilot flame. The flame will burn high and erratically as it “hunts” for oxygen to burn. This erratic flame fails to heat the thermocouple completely resulting in a drop in the millivolts produced and the gas valve shuts off the gas supply to the heater. There is no solution to solve this complaint. If your home is above 4500 feet you may need to look into appliances that do not require an ODS.

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Gas troubleshooting charts.

Click here to view our Gas Troubleshooting Chart.

All installed gas products sold by World Marketing of America Inc. should only be installed and/or serviced by a qualified installer, service agency, or gas supplier. The information published on this website is meant to further educate the end user. This information does not replace the owner’s manual provided with the heater. The owner’s manual must be read and all instructions followed to avoid potentially hazardous conditions.

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